Edible Seeds & Why They’re Good for You

Written by: on Monday, November 3rd, 2014

I love this chart highlighting the benefits of seeds. We’re not conditioned to think of seeds as a food here in America—but we should. (I personally love flax and chia seeds because they’re chockfull of omega-3s [I sprinkle them on my oatmeal every day] — and sesame seeds, which I sprinkle on my salads, because they’re high in calcium.) Take a look and find a seed to try in your diet.

6 Edible Seeds: Here is why you should sprinkle them into your diet
“6 Edible Seeds” on Health Perch

Whole Grain Applesauce Bread

Written by: on Friday, May 9th, 2014
Applesauce bread

Top this bread with peanut or almond butter for an even healthier snack.

In honor of Applesauce Cake Day (coming up on June 6) check out my recipe on Playdate Place  for Homemade Applesauce Cake. My family gave it two thumbs up. Still feeling inspired, plus I had some leftover applesauce, I decided to lighten up my mother-in-law’s applesauce bread. She gave me her recipe 25 years ago and let’s just say, it was time for an update. For starters, I cut back on the sugar. To add fiber and grains, I used whole-wheat white flour instead of the usual all-purpose white flour. Rather than butter (I know it tastes so rich), I used heart-healthy canola oil. The makeover was worth it! Thanks to the applesauce and buttermilk, my Whole Grain Applesauce Bread is super moist and still has a buttery flavor. I have no idea who came up with National Applesauce Cake Day but I love applesauce! Check out my recipe for homemade applesauce. It’s so easy and fun to make with your kids. In the mean time, enjoy my applesauce bread. I wonder what my mother-in-law will think?

 

Whole Grain Applesauce Bread

Makes 12 servings

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 1 hour

 

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups whole wheat white flour

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/8 teaspoon baking powder

3 large egg whites

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup canola oil

1 cup unsweetened applesauce

1/2 cup raisins

1/4 cup buttermilk

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat a 9 X 5-inch loaf pan with nonstick spray.

In a large bowl, mix the flour, cinnamon, baking soda and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat the egg whites, sugar and oil. Blend in applesauce and buttermilk. Add flour mixture and stir until moistened. Stir in raisins. Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan.

Bake for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

 

Nutrition Information per slice 228 calories, 3.5 grams protein, 33 grams carbohydrate, 9.5 grams fat, 0.5 grams saturated fat, 0.5 milligrams cholesterol, 2.5 grams dietary fiber, 78.5 milligram sodium

Different type of flour to bake with

Try substituting different types of flour in this recipe: We tried substituting gluten-free flour for whole wheat and it worked great.

 

Alternative to Milk in Recipes

We also tried making this recipe dairy free by taking out the buttermilk—and it worked. We substituted rice milk (you could also use almond milk) for buttermilk and added a tablespoon of chia seeds soaked in 2 tablespoons of water.

 

A Delicious, Super Healthy Snack

Written by: on Monday, April 28th, 2014

Chia Pod BananaI picked up some Banana Chia Pods while I was doing my weekly grocery shopping—and I have fallen in love! This convenient snack only contains three! ingredients (which follows my simple, healthy eating philosophy): chia seeds, coconut milk, and real bananas. The banana definitely tastes fresh…and there are no added sugars! Plus, one container contains 259 milligrams of potassium—a mineral key for so many things like regulating blood pressure and keeping your kidneys healthy.

These snacks are also rich in fiber and omega-3s (of course, because chias are chockfull of omega-3 fatty acids). Take a look at the ingredient label, below. Bottom line: definitely try these yummy treats—particularly as a substitute for more sugary snacks. (You can buy a 12-pack for $40, about $3 a snack, at thechiaco.com.au; just be sure to click the US flag at the bottom of the page…otherwise, you’ll be ordering from Australia!) The only downside: they use a lot of plastic for this one snack (plastic top, plastic spoon included, and plastic cup); while I do recycle plastic, I want to find a way to re-use these snack pods to make buying these worthwhile. (I think they’d make a great on-the-go snack container for kids on long car rides!) And while I’m not a fan of plastic at all, glass chia pod containers are never going to happen unless I make my own banana chia pudding…stay tuned!

Chia Pod Nutrition