Where hath all my willpower gone?

There have been platefuls of cookies sitting in my kitchen as of late: leftover Super Bowl treats and heart-shaped Valentine’s Day goodies, complete with pink frosting, sprinkles, and jellybeans. But I’ve never been one of those people who can leave a plate of goodies out on the counter—and casually resist their call. You might argue: Who really has willpower strong enough to do that?

Sweets should come with a warning label: DANGEROUS TO THOSE WITH LITTLE TO NO WILLPOWER. STORE OUT OF SIGHT!

There definitely are people: a friend of mine used to have a giant jar of M&M’s on her desk and only ate a few per day (crazy but true!). I was always so impressed and told her that if I had a jar like that on my desk, I’d eat the candy by the fistfuls! No joke—and the reason why I never had (or ever will have!) a candy jar on my desk.

So I’ve always been of the mindset that I should just keep the treats out of the house altogether: no treats equals zero temptation—and no extra pudge around the middle.

But I could not just toss the cookies in the trash as I might have done years ago; not only do I realize that it’s a complete waste of food, but my son likes them with his lunch and my daughter eats them as afternoon treats. So as my kids get older, I need to learn to manage my stay-slim tricks accordingly.

What I have found: by just moving the treats out of view (Ziploc them up and put them in the cupboard or, better yet, store them in the furthest recesses of the freezer), I don’t nibble on them all day. In fact, I don’t even think about them. It’s an easy and quick solution. And in the meantime, I’m working on why I feel the need to eat four cookies off the plate in the first place!

Valerie LatonaAbout Valerie Latona
As the former editor in chief of Shape (the active lifestyle magazine) for 5 years, I personally spoke with a lot of women (thousands over the years, from around the nation) and what I found is this: it's not easy to stay healthy, to get (and stay) fit, and to stem the weight gain tide (and even the tide of disease) that inevitably happens to us as we get older.