Get Married For a Healthier Heart?

Happily Married Couple

Turns out that love, particularly when it results in marriage, keeps your heart healthy.

A recent survey of 3.5 million Americans has shown that people who are married—regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular disease risk factors—have significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who are single, widowed, or divorced.

I find this fascinating because while we do so much for a healthy heart—exercise regularly, eat healthy, etc.—there are social factors, like marriage, that play a big role, too (and are often forgotten).

With so many couples griping about their own marriages, I had to ask lead study investigator and NYU Langone cardiology fellow Carlos L. Alviar, M.D., if this research applies to couples, whether they’re happily married or not. And, according to Alviar, these findings do hold true for both happy and unhappy couples. Here’s what he had to say:

“There are some intrinsic factors from just having a spouse or partner that could contribute to better cardiovascular health,” he says. “For instance, a spouse might still take care of his/her significant other and promote healthy habits (medical follow up, diet, exercise, medication compliance, etc.) even if their marriage is not the most harmonious one. In the same way, the fact of not being alone might also contribute to lower levels of physical and psychological stress—which directly affect cardiovascular disease—even if at other times there are disagreements or unpleasant moments.”

There you have it: if you’re worried about heart disease—get hitched or stay hitched. Here are some of the interesting stats from this research, courtesy of NYU Langone Medical Center:

Married People Have Less Cardiovascular Problems

 

 

 

 

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Valerie LatonaAbout Valerie Latona
As the former editor in chief of Shape (the active lifestyle magazine) for 5 years, I personally spoke with a lot of women (thousands over the years, from around the nation) and what I found is this: it's not easy to stay healthy, to get (and stay) fit, and to stem the weight gain tide (and even the tide of disease) that inevitably happens to us as we get older.